Top 5 Most Quiet Mechanical Switches


At first, most people are attracted to mechanical keyboards due to the loud, satisfying clicking noises that some switches make.

However, after the honeymoon phase ends, you are left with a loud keyboard that they can’t use at work or around other people.

The loud clicking noise that used to bring such joy to their life, now echoes in the background when attempting to play video games and chatting with friends.

The clicks have become a curse that follow you everywhere.

A change is needed, it’s time to change your switches to a quieter option. But with so many silent switch options available, which one is the best?

#1 Pick: ZealPC Healios

Our first pick is the Healios, a silent linear switch made by ZealPC.

his is the quietest linear switch available on the market, and an excellent option for those who want to keep their typing sounds low.

The Healios have a silencing bumper to dampen not only the bottom out sounds, but also the up-stroke sounds. This means that the switch is silenced when pressed and released.

The switch also has a 67g bottom out force, which is slightly on the heavier side. Most mechanical keyboard switches have a bottom out force of around 45-60g.

Keep in mind these switches are on the pricier side, coming out to $1.20 each. It’s hard to beat the quality and sound of these switches though, so the price may be worth it for you.

#2 Pick: ZealPC Zilents V2

Second up is the ZealPC Zilent V2.

The Zilents are very similar to the Healios, but they are tactile instead of linear. The Zilents have a big smooth bump to provide tactile feedback to the user, and unlike other switches the bump starts at the very start of the key press with no pre-travel.

This means the keystroke does not happen unless you press hard enough to clear the bump, which removes user error from “half-pressing” a key. Coming in four different bottom-out forces, each Zilent variation offers its own feel and resistance. The different weights include 62g, 65g, 67g, and 78g.

At a price of $1.20 each, these are not cheap switches but similar to the Healios, the quality is great.

#3 Pick: Gateron Silent Red/Black

Gateron Silent Red and Blacks are both linear switches that are super smooth and super quiet.

Gateron switches are known to be budget-friendly, so they make an excellent option for those who don’t have a ton to spend on switches.

Not to mention, Gateron switches tend to be smoother than the Cherry counterparts.

The only downside to Gateron switches is that they last for around 50 million keystrokes, which is half of what Cherry MX lasts for. You read more about the differences here.

Coming in at around $0.30-0.50 each, the price is more affordable than the first two options on the list. Making it a better pick for those trying to keep their costs low.

You can find Gateron Silent switches on Amazon for a pretty good price.

#4 Pick: Cherry MX Silent Red/Black

The Cherry MX Silent switches are linear with a 3.7mm total travel distance. They are slightly quieter than the other Cherry MX linear switches with a slightly different feel.

The switches have rubber dampening on the stem which keeps the switch from producing as much noise on impact.

The only downside to this design is it makes the switch feel more muddy on each keystroke. You do need to sacrifice the feel for noise reduction.

The Silent Reds have a 45 g bottom-out force and the Silent Blacks have a 60g bottom-out force.

The Cherry MX Silent switches are ranked number four because they produce a slightly louder and higher pitched noise than the ZealPC switches listed above and they are scratchier than the Gateron switches.

#5 Pick: Matias Quiet Linear

The Matias Quiet Linear is a truly quiet switch made for court stenographers and anyone else working in a environment where they need to keep the typing sounds low.

The spring has a unique design where there is more resistance at the start of the keypress that gradually decreases as the internal spring is compressed.

The Matias Quiet switches are slightly louder than the other options on the list, but are still a great pick for anyone looking for a quiet switch.

These are the cheapest on the list by far, coming in at $50 for a box of 200 switches. Or about $0.25 each.

Favorite Quiet Mechanical Keyboards

1. Ducky One 2 Mini: Best Quiet Keyboard for Gaming

The Ducky One 2 Mini is an excellent all-around 60% mechanical keyboard. We love using this keyboard for a mix of gaming and typing.

The keyboard comes with your choice of Cherry MX switches, so you can opt for the Cherry MX Silent Red or Silent Black if you need your keyboard to be a bit more quiet.

The Ducky One 2 Mini also comes with additional keycaps that you can swap out to customize the build even further. The keyboard is a lot of fun to tinker with.

You can check out our full review of the Ducky One 2 Mini, it is also included in our best 60% keyboard list.

The Ducky One 2 Mini is available for a really good price.

2. Durgod K320: Best Quiet Mechanical Keyboard for the Office

The Durgod K320 is one of the best keyboards for typing.

Durgod is known for their buttery smooth stabilizers and awesome build quality. If you’re looking for a mechanical keyboard for work, you can’t pass up on this one.

Much like the Ducky One 2 Mini, you have the option to purchase the keyboard with Cherry MX Silent switches so you can make it nice and stealthy.

The keycaps comes in a nice PBT material and two color design that is sure to impress.

You can find the Durgod K320 on Amazon with a bunch of different switch options.

3. Ducky MIYA Pro: Best Silent 65% Keyboard

The Ducky MIYA Pro is one of our absolute favorite keyboards.

The keyboard comes in a nice compact 65% layout which makes it perfect the perfect balance of comfort and compactness.

If you’ve ever wanted a keyboard with a specialized design, look no further. The MIYA Pro comes in a ton of different colorful unique designs that are sure to impress.

You can check out all of the different options:

The Ducky MIYA Pro can be purchased with Cherry MX Silent Red switches to make it super quiet when typing.

Overall, this is one of our favorite 65% keyboards, so you can’t go wrong with this pick.

4. Leopold FC980M: Excellent Silent Keyboard for Data Entry

The Leopold FC980M is another excellent option. This keyboard comes is really nice 1800-compact or 96% layout.

This layout is perfect for those who want access to a number pad, but don’t need the traditional navigational cluster that often goes unused. It’s a great way to save space without compromising utility.

The FC980M comes with two-color PBT keycaps and lots of other bells and whistlyes. I believe it’s one of the best pre-built mechanical keyboards on the market.

The keyboard comes with a silent switch option as well so you don’t need to worry about having a loud distracting keyboard.

You can find the FC980 on mechanicalkeyboards.com for a good price.

5. Keychron K6: Great Quiet Keyboard for Mac

The Keychron K6 is a feature-packed 65% keyboard.

This keyboard is compatible with Windows and Mac which makes it work with almost every computer. Not to mention it can connect through wired/wireless, so more worrying about being stuck at your desk.

You also have the option to opt for an aluminum case which makes this keyboard incredibly durable and well-built.

My favorite feature of the keyboard is that it’s hot-swappable, which means you can choose which switch to put in the keyboard.

You’re not stuck to any one switch, so you can pick the silent switch that fits best within your budget and needs. Pretty cool, huh?

You can find the Keychron K6 on Amazon with a few different options.

Why does Sound Matter?

The sound of a keyboard switch is one of the biggest factors when picking out a switch for your new mechanical keyboard. The other factor is typically the feel of the switch.

If you plan on recording videos, streaming, talking over a microphone, or working in a public space, it’s a good idea to stay away from the loudest and clicky switch types.

The loud switches will create more background noise and microphones will pick up the sound of each keystroke. It’s also good to keep in mind, most people don’t enjoy the sound of your loud keyboard, especially in an enclosed area packed with people.

Avoid these loud switches:

  • Cherry MX Blue, Green, and White
  • Kailh BOX White, BOX Navy, and Kailh BOX Jade

Not All Sounds Are Created Equal

The pure decibel output of a keyboard switch is not the only factor when it comes to deciding which switch is the best pick for you.

While certain switches may be quieter than others, a switch that emits a higher-pitched sound tends to be get picked up more on microphones and is more disturbing to those around you.

A deep, low-pitched sounding switch on the other hand, will be less intrusive and tends to not get picked up by microphones as much, even if it’s louder.

The lower-pitched sound is generally much more pleasing on the ears and is a sound most keyboard switch manufacturers and enthusiasts attempt to go for when buying a keyboard.

Other sound factors include the amount the switch rattles and shakes. Rattling is when the switch is not fully secured or machined to a tight tolerance, this makes the moving components inside the switch bang against each other instead of smoothly sliding up and down.

The rattling increases the noise output of the keyboard and makes the sound output much more unpleasant. Because of this, we considered this factor when making our top five list.

Your Keyboard Case & Stabilizers Matter

It’s important to note that the switch is not the only factor that determines the sound of the keystroke. The overall build material of the case can change the overall feel and sound of each key.

For example, the lighter and more flexible materials such as plastic, tend to create more noise and dampen the sound less. The flexible material allows the vibrations and sound to travel through the keyboard, instead of reducing the overall decibel output.

Case materials such as aluminum, steel, and acrylic are heavier and sturdier. Because of their denser build material, they can dampen the sound of the keystrokes more effectively, creating a quieter and deeper sounding switch.  

The stabilizers are also a big factor in determining the overall sound output of your keyboard. Stabilizers are placed under your larger keys, such as your spacebar, and reduce the amount the key shakes when pressed. Therefore, stabilizing it.

By reducing the amount the keys shake, stabilizers can lower the overall sound output of your keyboard. There are several ways to make your stabilizers more effective at reducing shakiness and ratting of your keys, but we’ll get into that later.

How to Make Your Keyboard Even Quieter

There are a lot of silent switch options out there, and we hope we’ve helped you narrow down your search. For some people, however, even with the silent switches, your keyboard may still feel too loud.

Do not fear! There are several other options you can do to lower the sound of your keyboard. Such as adding a dampener inside your keyboard case, lubricating your switches, adding O-rings, and other great options. Check out this post for a more in-depth write up on how to lower the sound output of your keyboard.

Conclusion

In general, there are a lot of factors that effect the overall sound output of your keyboard including the case, stabilizers, and switches. In this article, we went over our top five picks for the best mechanical keyboard switch to make your keyboard more quiet.

Our top pick was the ZealPC Healios with the Zilents in close second. Both of these switches are incredibly silent and have excellent build quality. While a bit on the pricier side, they are worth it if your budget allows it.

If not, there are other great options on this list that are more affordable as well.

We also recommend ordering a sample pack to test out several different switch types to figure out the best switch for you.

We hope you found some helpful information in this post and are one step closer to getting your next keyboard.

And, as always, happy typing!

Jake Harrington

Jake has been an avid mechanical keyboard user for the past six years. He has a background in Mechanical Engineering and wants to apply his expertise to break down how mechanical keyboards and other tech work to show the world all of the cool aspects of the hobby.

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